• merge latest version of rannotate code from corecode
[alioth/cvs.git] / contrib / intro.doc
1 Date: Tue, 16 Jun 1992 17:05:23 +0200
2 From: Steven.Pemberton@cwi.nl
3 Message-Id: <9206161505.AA06927.steven@sijs.cwi.nl>
4 To: berliner@Sun.COM
5 Subject: cvs
6
7 INTRODUCTION TO USING CVS
8
9     CVS is a system that lets groups of people work simultaneously on
10     groups of files (for instance program sources).
11
12     It works by holding a central 'repository' of the most recent version
13     of the files.  You may at any time create a personal copy of these
14     files; if at a later date newer versions of the files are put in the
15     repository, you can 'update' your copy.
16
17     You may edit your copy of the files freely. If new versions of the
18     files have been put in the repository in the meantime, doing an update
19     merges the changes in the central copy into your copy.
20         (It can be that when you do an update, the changes in the
21         central copy clash with changes you have made in your own
22         copy. In this case cvs warns you, and you have to resolve the
23         clash in your copy.)
24
25     When you are satisfied with the changes you have made in your copy of
26     the files, you can 'commit' them into the central repository.
27         (When you do a commit, if you haven't updated to the most
28         recent version of the files, cvs tells you this; then you have
29         to first update, resolve any possible clashes, and then redo
30         the commit.)
31
32 USING CVS
33
34     Suppose that a number of repositories have been stored in
35     /usr/src/cvs. Whenever you use cvs, the environment variable
36     CVSROOT must be set to this (for some reason):
37
38         CVSROOT=/usr/src/cvs
39         export CVSROOT
40
41 TO CREATE A PERSONAL COPY OF A REPOSITORY
42
43     Suppose you want a copy of the files in repository 'views' to be
44     created in your directory src. Go to the place where you want your
45     copy of the directory, and do a 'checkout' of the directory you
46     want:
47
48         cd $HOME/src
49         cvs checkout views
50
51     This creates a directory called (in this case) 'views' in the src
52     directory, containing a copy of the files, which you may now work
53     on to your heart's content.
54
55 TO UPDATE YOUR COPY
56
57     Use the command 'cvs update'.
58
59     This will update your copy with any changes from the central
60     repository, telling you which files have been updated (their names
61     are displayed with a U before them), and which have been modified
62     by you and not yet committed (preceded by an M). You will be
63     warned of any files that contain clashes, the clashes will be
64     marked in the file surrounded by lines of the form <<<< and >>>>.
65    
66 TO COMMIT YOUR CHANGES
67
68     Use the command 'cvs commit'.
69
70     You will be put in an editor to make a message that describes the
71     changes that you have made (for future reference). Your changes
72     will then be added to the central copy.
73
74 ADDING AND REMOVING FILES
75
76     It can be that the changes you want to make involve a completely
77     new file, or removing an existing one. The commands to use here
78     are:
79
80         cvs add <filename>
81         cvs remove <filename>
82
83     You still have to do a commit after these commands. You may make
84     any number of new files in your copy of the repository, but they
85     will not be committed to the central copy unless you do a 'cvs add'.
86
87 OTHER USEFUL COMMANDS AND HINTS
88
89     To see the commit messages for files, and who made them, use:
90
91         cvs log [filenames]
92
93     To see the differences between your version and the central version:
94
95         cvs diff [filenames]
96
97     To give a file a new name, rename it and do an add and a remove.
98
99     To lose your changes and go back to the version from the
100     repository, delete the file and do an update.
101
102     After an update where there have been clashes, your original
103     version of the file is saved as .#file.version.
104
105     All the cvs commands mentioned accept a flag '-n', that doesn't do
106     the action, but lets you see what would happen. For instance, you
107     can use 'cvs -n update' to see which files would be updated.
108
109 MORE INFORMATION
110
111     This is necessarily a very brief introduction. See the manual page
112     (man cvs) for full details.